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Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

Authors
  • Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil1
  • Tsui, Irena2
  • Sadda, Srinivas R3
  • 1 Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Eye Research Center, Rassoul Akram Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 2 Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 3 Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Vision research
Publication Date
Jul 20, 2017
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2017.02.009
PMID: 28688908
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy.

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