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Ultrastructural changes in intersegmental cuticle during rotation of the terminal abdominal segments in a mosquito.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tissue and Cell
0040-8166
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
9
Issue
2
Pages
241–254
Identifiers
PMID: 906015
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The terminal abdominal segments of male Aedes aegypti rotate 180 degrees within 24 hr after adult emergence, rotation occurring in the intersegmental membrane between abdominal segments VII and VIII. The ultrastructure of this rotating membrane is compared with non-rotating intersegmental membranes at different developmental stages. The deposition of cuticle in both the rotating and non-rotating intersegments appears ultrastructurally similar, and follows the sequential pattern described for the insects. Shortly after adult emergence, however, disruptive changes occur in the membrane cuticle that are more pronounced in non-rotating intersegments. This disruption occurs initially 1 hr after adult emergence and becomes maximal within 3 hr. Disruption appears to occur by the addition of fluid to the cuticle and results in a ten-fold increase in cuticle thickness in non-rotating intersegments but only a two-fold increase in thickness in the rotating intersement. While in the disrupted condition, the non-rotating intersegmental membranes become extensively folded whereas the cuticle in the rotating intersegment becomes stretched. During rotation, strain forces in the rotating intersegment result in a reorientation of microfibers in the cuticle from parabolic to parallel. This reorientation is presumably brought about by plastic flow.

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