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Two years of neurosurgical intraoperative MRI in Sweden - evaluation of use and costs.

Authors
  • Kaijser, Magnus1, 2
  • Frisk, Henrik3
  • Persson, Oscar4, 5
  • Burström, Gustav4, 5
  • Suneson, Annika1
  • El-Hajj, Victor Gabriel4
  • Fagerlund, Michael1
  • Edström, Erik4, 6, 7
  • Elmi-Terander, Adrian4, 6, 7, 8
  • 1 Department of Neuroradiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. [email protected]. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 6 Capio Spine Center Stockholm, Löwenströmska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 7 Department of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Orebro, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 8 Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta Neurochirurgica
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 13, 2024
Volume
166
Issue
1
Pages
80–80
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00701-024-05978-3
PMID: 38349473
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The current shortage of radiology staff in healthcare provides a challenge for departments all over the world. This leads to more evaluation of how the radiology resources are used and a demand to use them in the most efficient way. Intraoperative MRI is one of many recent advancements in radiological practice. If radiology staff is performing intraoperative MRI at the operation ward, they may be impeded from performing other examinations at the radiology department, creating costs in terms of exams not being performed. Since this is a kind of cost whose importance is likely to increase, we have studied the practice of intraoperative MRI in Sweden. The study includes data from the first four hospitals in Sweden that installed MRI scanners adjacent to the operating theaters. In addition, we included data from Karolinska University Hospital in Solna where intraoperative MRI is carried out at the radiology department. Scanners that were moved into the operation theater and doing no or few other scans were used 11-12% of the days. Stationary scanners adjacent to the operation room were used 35-41% of the days. For scanners situated at the radiology department doing intraoperative scans interspersed among all other scans, the proportion was 92%. Our study suggests that performing exams at the radiology department rather than at several locations throughout the hospital may be an efficient approach to tackle the simultaneous trends of increasing demands for imaging and increasing staff shortages at radiology departments. © 2024. The Author(s).

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