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Two-dimensional lipid mixing entropy regulates the formation of multicomponent lipoplexes.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Physical Chemistry B
1520-5207
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Volume
110
Issue
42
Pages
20829–20835
Identifiers
PMID: 17048894
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The mechanism of formation of multicomponent lipoplexes was investigated by means of synchrotron Small-Angle X-ray Diffraction (SAXD). Mixed lipid dispersions were prepared by mixing different populations of binary cationic liposomes. When adding DNA to mixed lipid dispersions, multicomponent lipoplexes spontaneously formed exhibiting structural properties, i.e., membrane thickness, surface charge density, and one-dimensional DNA packing density, intermediate between those of binary lipoplexes. These results suggested that DNA lets liposomes come into contact and fuse and that a complete lipid mixing at the molecular level occurs. The equilibrium structure of multicomponent lipoplexes was found to be unique and did not depend on the number and kind of populations composing lipid dispersion but only on the lipid species involved and on their relative molar ratio. According to recent theoretical models we identified two-dimensional lipid mixing entropy as the key factor regulating the existence of only multicomponent lipoplexes with ideally mixed lipid species.

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