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Tuning the Multifunctionality of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Self-Assembled Mixed Lipid Layers.

Authors
  • Preiss, Matthew R1
  • Cournoyer, Eily1
  • Paquin, Karissa L2
  • Vuono, Elizabeth A2
  • Belanger, Kayla1
  • Walsh, Edward3
  • Howlett, Niall G2
  • Bothun, Geoffrey D1
  • 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rhode Island , 51 Lower College Road, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Rhode Island , 379 CBLS, 120 Flagg Road, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Neuroscience, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute for Brain Science, Institute for Molecular and Nanoscale Innovation, Associate Director for MRI Physics, Brown University , Sidney E. Frank Hall, 185 Meeting Street, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Bioconjugate Chemistry
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Nov 15, 2017
Volume
28
Issue
11
Pages
2729–2736
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.7b00483
PMID: 29035511
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We present an approach to tuning the multifunctionality of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) using mixed self-assembled monolayers of cationic lipid and anionic polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipid. By forming stable, monodispersed lipid-coated IONs (L-IONs) through a solvent-exchange technique, we were able to demonstrate the relationship between surface charge, the magnetic transverse relaxivity (r2 from T2-weighted images), and the binding capacity of small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) as a function of the cationic-to-anionic (PEG) lipid ratio. These properties were controlled by the cationic charge and the PEG conformation; relaxivity and siRNA binding could be varied in the mushroom and brush regimes but not at high brush densities. In vitro results combining cell viability, uptake, and transfection efficiency using HeLa cells suggest that the functional physicochemical and biological properties of L-IONs may be best achieved using catanionic lipid coatings near equimolar ratios of cationic to anionic PEG-lipids.

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