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Tuning microenvironment modulus and biochemical composition promotes human mesenchymal stem cell tenogenic differentiation.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Volume
104
Issue
5
Pages
1162–1162
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.35650
Source
maverakislab-ucdavis dermatology-ucdavis
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising for the regeneration of tendon and ligament tissues. Toward realizing this potential, microenvironment conditions are needed for promoting robust lineage-specific differentiation into tenocytes/ligament fibroblasts. Here, we utilized a statistical design of experiments approach to examine combinations of matrix modulus, composition, and soluble factors in human MSC tenogenic/ligamentogenic differentiation. Specifically, well-defined poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels were synthesized using thiol-ene chemistry providing a bioinert base for probing cell response to extracellular matrix cues. Monomer concentrations were varied to achieve a range of matrix moduli (E ∼ 10-90 kPa), and different ratios of integrin-binding peptides were incorporated (GFOGER and RGDS for collagen and fibronectin, respectively), mimicking aspects of developing tendon/ligament tissue. A face-centered central composite response surface design was utilized to understand the contributions of these cues to human MSC differentiation in the presence of soluble factors identified to promote tenogenesis/ligamentogenesis (BMP-13 and ascorbic acid). Increasing modulus and collagen mimetic peptide content increased relevant gene expression and protein production or retention (scleraxis, collagen I, tenascin-C). These findings could inform the design of materials for tendon/ligament regeneration. More broadly, the design of experiments enabled efficient data acquisition and analysis, requiring fewer replicates than if each factor had been varied one at a time. This approach can be combined with other stimuli (for example, mechanical stimulation) toward a better mechanistic understanding of differentiation down these challenging lineages.

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