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Troglostrongylus brevior: a feline lungworm of paediatric concern.

Authors
  • Cavalera, Maria Alfonsa1
  • Iatta, Roberta1
  • Colella, Vito1
  • Dantas-Torres, Filipe2
  • Corsaro, Angelo3
  • Brianti, Emanuele4
  • Otranto, Domenico5
  • 1 Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy; Department of Immunology, Aggeu Magalhães Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, 50670-420 Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Clinica Borgo Nuovo, 53034 Colle di val D'Elsa, Siena, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie, Università degli Studi di Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 5 Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Veterinary parasitology
Publication Date
Apr 15, 2018
Volume
253
Pages
8–11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.02.017
PMID: 29605009
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The immature immune system of cats in their paediatric age (i.e., first six months of life) favours the establishment of infectious respiratory tract diseases mainly caused by well recognized viruses and bacteria species. Conversely, lungworm infections are less investigated during respiratory disorders in kittens. In the last decade, Troglostrongylus brevior has been found affecting the respiratory tract of cats, along with the better-known Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Given the scant data available on the epidemiology of feline troglostrongylosis, faecal samples from 575 domestic animals living in three Italian municipalities (i.e., Bari, Messina and Siena) were screened for lungworm infection by Baermann and molecular tecniques. Animals were grouped according to their age as ≤6 months (i.e., paediatric patients), 6-24 months, or >24 months. Paediatric cats were further sub-divided in infant (2-6 weeks), weanling (6-12 weeks) and juvenile (3-6 months). Of the 575 animals tested, 241 (42.0%) were younger than 6 months, 188 (33%) were 6-24-month-old and 146 (25%) were older than 24 months. Lungworm infection was diagnosed in 84 (14.6%) of the examined cats. Of the 49 (20.3%) paediatric animals positive for lungworms, T. brevior was the nematode species most frequently diagnosed (n = 44; 89.8%), followed by A. abstrusus (n = 2; 4.1%), and three cats (6.1%) were co-infected by both species. The diagnosis of T. brevior infection was significantly associated with animals aging ≤6 months (18.2%; P < 0.01) than elder cats. Indeed, the prevalence of infection by T. brevior decreased in animals aging 6-24 months (3.2%) being not detected in cats older than two years. Results of this study indicate that paediatric cats are at higher risk of T. brevior infection compared to adults (P < 0.01). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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