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Trillium govanianum Wall. Ex. Royle rhizomes extract-medicated silver nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activity

Authors
  • Uz-Zaman, Khaleeq1
  • Bakht, Jehan1
  • Malikovna, Bates Kudaibergenova2
  • Elsharkawy, Eman R.3
  • Khalil, Anees Ahmed4
  • Bawazeer, Saud5
  • Rauf, Abdur6
  • 1 Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, The University of Agriculture, KPK , (Pakistan)
  • 2 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Kazakhstan , (Kazakhstan)
  • 3 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Saudi Arabia , (Saudi Arabia)
  • 4 University Institute of Diet and Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Pakistan , (Pakistan)
  • 5 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box 42 , (Saudi Arabia)
  • 6 Department of Chemistry, University of Swabi, Anbar, KPK , (Pakistan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Green Processing and Synthesis
Publisher
De Gruyter
Publication Date
Sep 28, 2020
Volume
9
Issue
1
Pages
503–514
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/gps-2020-0054
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Synthesis of nanoparticles is a fast-growing area of interest in the current development in science and technology. Nanoparticles are also used in biomedical applications. Green synthesis of nanoparticles is an environmental friendly and cost-effective technique. Trillium govanianum Wall. Ex. Royle crude extract was used for the eco-friendly genesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Aromatic amines were the functional groups involved in the bio-fabrication and synthesis of the AgNPs. The production of AgNPs was established by the appearance of brown color. The manufactured AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer, and FTIR spectrophotometer. AgNPs were face-centered cubic in nature with an average size of 9.99 nm. The produced AgNPs (18 µL disc−1) showed substantial antibacterial (53.74, 52.75, 51.61, 43.00, 36.84, and 36.84%) and antifungal (54.05, 42.11, 41.10, 40.85, 30.55, and 29.73%) potential against the tested bacterial (X. campestris, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, E. coli, B. subtilis, and K. pneumoniae) and fungal (A. alternaria, Paecilomyces, C. albicans, Curvularia, A. niger, and Rhizopus) strains, respectively.

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