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Trends in the use of cigarettes, cigars, and marijuana among students with and without asthma, 2003-2017.

Authors
  • Everett Jones, Sherry1
  • King, Brian A2
  • Leroy, Zanie3
  • 1 Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
  • 2 Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
  • 3 Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Asthma
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2020
Volume
57
Issue
4
Pages
391–397
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/02770903.2019.1573254
PMID: 30729834
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Aim: Asthma has symptoms that can be exacerbated by using combustible products such as tobacco and marijuana. This study assessed the prevalence and trends in current use of cigarettes, cigars, and marijuana among U.S. high school students with and without asthma. Methods: The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is a biennial, school-based, nationally representative survey of U.S. students in grades 9-12. Trends during 2003-2017 in current (past 30-day) use of cigarettes, cigars, and marijuana among students with and without asthma were examined using logistic regression. Asthma was defined as reporting that a doctor or nurse ever told the student they had asthma. T-tests were used to compare cigarette, cigar, and marijuana use by asthma status and year, frequency of use, and student characteristics. Results: During 2003-2017, both current cigarette and cigar smoking decreased (p < 0.05) with rates that were similar among students with and without asthma. There was no significant linear change in current marijuana use, irrespective of asthma status. During most years, cigarette, cigar, and marijuana use were more common among students with asthma than without. In 2017, the most frequent use of cigarettes, cigars, and marijuana was among those with asthma than without. Differences in cigarette, cigar, and marijuana use by asthma status were apparent by demographic subgroups. Conclusions: Given the adverse respiratory effects of tobacco and marijuana smoking, efforts to educate all youth about the dangers of using these substances is critical, particularly among those with asthma.

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