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Trends in Glucose-Lowering Drug Use, Glycemic Control, and Severe Hypoglycemia in Adults With Diabetes in Hong Kong, 2002-2016.

Authors
  • Yang, Aimin1, 2
  • Wu, Hongjiang1
  • Lau, Eric S H1
  • Ma, Ronald C W1, 2, 3
  • Kong, Alice P S1, 2, 3
  • So, Wing Yee4
  • Luk, Andrea O Y1, 2, 3
  • Chan, Juliana C N1, 2, 3
  • Chow, Elaine5, 2
  • 1 Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. , (China)
  • 2 Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. , (China)
  • 3 Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. , (China)
  • 4 Hong Kong Hospital Authority Head Office, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. , (China)
  • 5 Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Diabetes care
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
12
Pages
2967–2974
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2337/dc20-0260
PMID: 33046501
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

There has been a shift toward new classes of glucose-lowering drugs (GLDs) in the past decade but no improvements in glycemic control or hospitalization rates due to severe hypoglycemia (SH) in previous surveys. We examined trends in GLDs use, glycemic control, and SH rate among patients with diabetes in Hong Kong, which introduced a territory-wide, team-based diabetes care model since 2000. Using population-based data from the Hong Kong Diabetes Surveillance Database, we estimated age- and sex-standardized proportion of GLD classes, mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and SH rates in 763,809 patients with diabetes aged ≥20 years between 2002 and 2016. Between 2002 and 2016, use declined for sulfonylureas (62.9% to 35.3%) but increased for metformin (48.4% to 61.4%) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4is) (0.01% in 2007 to 8.3%). The proportion of patients with HbA1c of 6.0-7.0% (42-53 mmol/mol) increased from 28.6% to 43.4%, while the SH rate declined from 4.2/100 person-years to 1.3/100 person-years. The main improvement in HbA1c occurred between 2007 and 2014, decreasing from mean (SD) 7.6% (1.6) (59.5 [19.0] mmol/mol) to 7.2% (1.7) (54.8 [18.9] mmol/mol) (P < 0.001). The 20-44 years age-group had the highest proportion of HbA1c ≥9% (75 mmol/mol) and rising proportions not on GLDs (from 2.0% to 7.7%). In this 15-year survey, the modest but important improvement in HbA1c since 2007 coincided with diabetes service reforms, increase in metformin, decrease in sulfonylureas, and modest rise in DPP-4i use. Persistently poor glycemic control and underuse of GLDs in the youngest group calls for targeted action. © 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.

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