Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Trends and characteristics of hospitalisations from the harmful use of opioids in England between 2008 and 2018: Population-based retrospective cohort study.

Authors
  • Friebel, Rocco1, 2
  • Maynou, Laia1, 3, 4
  • 1 Department of Health Policy, The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE, UK.
  • 2 Center for Global Development Europe, London, Abbey Gardens, SW1P 3SE, UK.
  • 3 Department of Econometrics, Statistics and Applied Economics, Universitat de Barcelona, 08034 Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 Center for Research in Health and Economics, University of Pompeu Fabra, 08005 Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
115
Issue
5
Pages
173–185
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/01410768221077360
PMID: 35114090
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To examine the trends and characteristics of opioid-related hospital admissions in England over 10 years, and its burden for the National Health Service and public finances. Patient-level data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database to examine all opioid-related hospitalisations from 2008 to 2018, stratified by type of opioid admission and patient demographics. All National Health Service hospitals in England. Patients hospitalised from the harmful use of opioids. The number of opioid-related hospitalisations, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission rate and treatment costs. Opioid-related hospitalisations increased by 48.9%, from 10,805 admissions in 2008 to 16,091 admissions in 2018, with total treatment costs of £137 million. The growth in opioid-related hospitalisations was 21% above the corresponding rate for all other emergency admissions in England. Relative changes showed that hospitalisations increased most for individuals older than 55 years (160%), those living in the most affluent areas of England (93.8%), and suffering from four co-morbidities (627.6%) or more. Hospitals reduced mean patient length of stay from 2.8 days to 1.1 days over 10 years. Mean in-hospital mortality was 0.4% and mean 30-day readmission risk was 16.6%. Opioid use is an increasing public health concern in England, though hospitalisation and mortality rates are less pronounced than in other countries. There are concerns about significant rises in hospitalisations from older, less deprived and sicker population groups. Our findings should prompt policymakers to go beyond monitoring mortality statistics when assessing the impacts of harmful use of opioids.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times