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Treatment of post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in emotionally distressed individuals.

Authors
  • Kasckow, John1
  • Morse, Jennifer2
  • Begley, Amy2
  • Anderson, Stewart3
  • Bensasi, Salem2
  • Thomas, Stephen4
  • Quinn, Sandra C5
  • Reynolds, Charles F 3rd2
  • 1 VA Pittsburgh Health Care System, MIRECC and Behavioral Health, University Drive C, Pittsburgh, PA 15420, USA; UPMC Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, 3811 O׳Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 UPMC Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, 3811 O׳Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
  • 3 University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 DeSoto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
  • 4 University of Maryland Center for Health Equity and the Department of Health Services Administration, School of Public Health. College Park, MD 20742, USA.
  • 5 University of Maryland Center for Health Equity and the Department of Family Science, School of Public Health. College Park, MD 20742, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychiatry research
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2014
Volume
220
Issue
1-2
Pages
370–375
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.06.043
PMID: 25107318
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Older individuals with emotional distress and a history of psychologic trauma are at risk for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. This study was an exploratory, secondary analysis of data from the study "Prevention of Depression in Older African Americans". It examined whether Problem Solving Therapy-Primary Care (PST-PC) would lead to improvement in PTSD symptoms in patients with subsyndromal depression and a history of psychologic trauma. The control condition was dietary education (DIET). Participants (n=60) were age 50 or older with scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale of 11 or greater and history of psychologic trauma. Exclusions stipulated no major depression and substance dependence within a year. Participants were randomized to 6-8 sessions of either PST-PC or DIET and followed 2 years with booster sessions every 6 months; 29 participants were in the PST-PC group and 31 were in the DIET group. Mixed effects models showed that improvement of PTSD Check List scores was significantly greater in the DIET group over two years than in the PST-PC group (based on a group time interaction). We observed no intervention⁎time interactions in Beck Depression Inventory or Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety subscale scores.

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