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Treating burns as if gender mattered.

Authors
  • Smith, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Links : a newsletter on gender for Oxfam GB staff and partners
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1998
Pages
3–3
Identifiers
PMID: 12348581
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In Egypt, low-income people often suffer burns because of the types of household fuels used and the lack of safety protection. Women and boys under the age of 5 years are the most vulnerable to this type of injury. This is because women do most of the cooking and because the stoves are on the floor, where they are easily over-turned by inquisitive, active youngsters. Women also suffer from intentional burns delivered as punishment by their husbands. When these burns result in death, the violence is labeled "suicide." Women also have a harder time receiving treatment than do men because the mobility of women is circumscribed, women's health is undervalued, and the treatment is lengthy. The Assiut project to treat burns has increased the status of female nurses who have received specific training in burn treatment. Treatment of female patients by male paramedics is also a new step that is leading to changes in the formalized male-female relationship found in rural Egyptian society. The project also takes into account the patient's right to rehabilitation, which is a novel idea in the Egyptian setting. Rehabilitation of women burn victims includes participation in group activities that generate income.

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