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Traumatic brain injury screening and neuropsychological functioning in women who experience intimate partner violence.

Authors
  • Raskin, Sarah A1, 2
  • DeJoie, Olivia3
  • Edwards, Carolyn4
  • Ouchida, Chloe2
  • Moran, Jocelyn2
  • White, Olivia2
  • Mordasiewicz, Michelle2
  • Anika, Dorothy2
  • Njoku, Blessing2
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA.
  • 2 Neuroscience Program, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA.
  • 3 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Lynn, MA, USA.
  • 4 University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Clinical neuropsychologist
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
38
Issue
2
Pages
354–376
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/13854046.2023.2215489
PMID: 37222525
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: The potential for traumatic brain injury (TBI) to occur as the result of intimate partner violence (IPV) has received increased interest in recent years. This study sought to investigate the possible occurrence of TBI in a group of women who survived IPV and to measure the specific profile of cognitive deficits using standardized neuropsychological measures. Method: A comprehensive questionnaire about abuse history; neuropsychological measures of attention, memory and executive functioning; and measures of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder were given to women who were IPV survivors, women who were sexual assault (SA) survivors, and a comparison group of women who did not experience IPV or SA. Results: Overall, rates of potential TBI, as measured by the HELPS brain injury screening tool, were high and consistent with previous studies. Consistent with potential TBI, lower scores were demonstrated on measures of memory and executive functioning compared to survivors of SA or those not exposed to violence. Importantly, significant differences on measures of memory and executive functioning remained, after controlling for measures of emotion. Of note, cognitive changes were highest among women who experienced non-fatal strangulation (NFS) compared to IPV survivors who did not. Conclusions: Rates of TBI may be high in women who survive IPV, especially those who survive strangulation. Better screening measures and appropriate interventions are needed as well as larger studies that look at social factors associated with IPV.

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