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Transposed basilic vein-brachial arteriovenous fistula: an alternative vascular access for hemodialysis.

Authors
  • Hatjibaloglou, A
  • Grekas, D
  • Saratzis, N
  • Megalopoulos, A
  • Moros, I
  • Kiskinis, D
  • Dalainas, V
Type
Published Article
Journal
Artificial organs
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1992
Volume
16
Issue
6
Pages
623–625
Identifiers
PMID: 1482333
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Twenty-five brachial-basilic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas with transposed basilic vein for alternative vascular access were created in 22 chronic hemodialysis patients. This surgical procedure was performed under brachial block or general anesthesia. After a longitudinal skin incision that was made in the inner side of the arm, the basilic vein was exposed, transposed subcutaneously, and anastomosed end-to-side to the brachial artery. The follow-up was between 7 and 24 months. Early complications were hemorrhage, thrombosis, steal syndrome, and swelling of the arm. Among the late complications were failure of the fistula because of thrombosis and multiple stenosis at the site of venipuncture. The accumulated one-year patency rate of fistulas was 81%. The complications of high-output cardiac failure or local infection were not seen in our study. On the basis of our results, the brachial-basilic AV fistula with transposed basilic vein is a useful and safe second- or third-choice vascular procedure for hemodialysis patients, in particular for women without good quality of vessels.

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