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Transpiration increases under high-temperature stress: Potential mechanisms, trade-offs and prospects for crop resilience in a warming world.

Authors
  • Sadok, Walid1
  • Lopez, Jose R1
  • Smith, Kevin P1
  • 1 Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Plant Cell & Environment
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
7
Pages
2102–2116
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/pce.13970
PMID: 33278035
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The frequency and intensity of high-temperature stress events are expected to increase as climate change intensifies. Concomitantly, an increase in evaporative demand, driven in part by global warming, is also taking place worldwide. Despite this, studies examining high-temperature stress impacts on plant productivity seldom consider this interaction to identify traits enhancing yield resilience towards climate change. Further, new evidence documents substantial increases in plant transpiration rate in response to high-temperature stress even under arid environments, which raise a trade-off between the need for latent cooling dictated by excessive temperatures and the need for water conservation dictated by increasing evaporative demand. However, the mechanisms behind those responses, and the potential to design the next generation of crops successfully navigating this trade-off, remain poorly investigated. Here, we review potential mechanisms underlying reported increases in transpiration rate under high-temperature stress, within the broader context of their impact on water conservation needed for crop drought tolerance. We outline three main contributors to this phenomenon, namely stomatal, cuticular and water viscosity-based mechanisms, and we outline research directions aiming at designing new varieties optimized for specific temperature and evaporative demand regimes to enhance crop productivity under a warmer and dryer climate. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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