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Transitivity Types Predict Communicative Abilities in Infants at Risk of Autism*

Authors
  • Schleier, Rebekka1
  • Iverson, Jana M.2
  • King, Andrew P.1
  • West, Meredith J.1
  • 1 Indiana University, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, 1101 E.10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405
  • 2 University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, 3415 Sennott Square, 210 S Bouquet St., Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Social Structure
Publisher
Exeley Inc.
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
20
Issue
3
Pages
119–139
Identifiers
DOI: 10.21307/joss-2019-009
Source
Exeley
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

To examine predictors of preschool language abilities, thirty-seven infants at high risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) were recorded longitudinally from 5-14 months as they interacted with their caregivers and toys at home. Triadic interactions were coded, categorized as transitive, intransitive or vacuously transitive, and then related to the MacArthur Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI-III) and the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL) at 36 months. The results show that prior to 14 months, early transitive interactions correlate positively and intransitive interactions correlate negatively with CDI-III and MSEL scores at 36 months. By categorizing interactions between 5-14 months by transitivity, we have demonstrated that recurring triadic patterns can predict communicative abilities at 36 months.

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