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Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores.

Authors
  • Zhang, Weiwei
  • Blackman, Leila M
  • Hardham, Adrienne R
Type
Published Article
Journal
PeerJ
Publisher
PeerJ
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Volume
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.221
PMID: 24392285
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen.

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