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Transcription of a variant human U6 small nuclear RNA gene is controlled by a novel, internal RNA polymerase III promoter.

Authors
  • Tichelaar, J W
  • Knerer, B
  • Vrabel, A
  • Wieben, E D
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular and cellular biology
Publication Date
Aug 01, 1994
Volume
14
Issue
8
Pages
5450–5457
Identifiers
PMID: 8035822
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Promoter elements in the 5' flanking regions of vertebrate U6 RNA genes have been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for transcription by RNA polymerase III. We have recently isolated and characterized a variant human U6 gene (87U6) that can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III in vitro in the absence of any natural 5' or 3' flanking sequences. This gene contains 10 nucleotide differences from the previously characterized human U6 gene (wtU6) within the coding region but has no homology to wtU6 in the upstream promoter region. By constructing chimeras between these two genes, we have shown that mutation of as few as two nucleotides in the coding region of the human U6 RNA gene is sufficient to create an internal promoter that is functional in vitro. A T-to-C transition at position 57 and a single T deletion at position 52 produce an internal U6 promoter that is nearly as active in vitro as the external U6 polymerase III promoter utilized by wtU6. Neither of these residues is absolutely conserved during evolution, and both of these nucleotide changes occur within the previously noted A box homology. Deletion and linker scanning mutations within the coding region of this variant U6 gene suggest that, in addition to the central region including bp 52 and 57, sequences at the extreme 5' end of the gene are critical for efficient transcription. In contrast, flanking sequences have a minor effect on transcriptional efficiency. This arrangement is unique among internal RNA polymerase III promoters and may indicate unique regulation of this gene.

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