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Training response inhibition to food is associated with weight loss and reduced energy intake.

Authors
  • Lawrence, Natalia S1
  • O'Sullivan, Jamie2
  • Parslow, David3
  • Javaid, Mahmood4
  • Adams, Rachel C5
  • Chambers, Christopher D6
  • Kos, Katarina7
  • Verbruggen, Frederick8
  • 1 School of Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 School of Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 School of Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 4 School of Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 5 School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 6 School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 7 University of Exeter Medical School, Barrack Road, Exeter, EX2 5DW, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 8 School of Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Appetite
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2015
Volume
95
Pages
17–28
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2015.06.009
PMID: 26122756
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The majority of adults in the UK and US are overweight or obese due to multiple factors including excess energy intake. Training people to inhibit simple motor responses (key presses) to high-energy density food pictures reduces intake in laboratory studies. We examined whether online response inhibition training reduced real-world food consumption and weight in a community sample of adults who were predominantly overweight or obese (N = 83). Participants were allocated in a randomised, double-blind design to receive four 10-min sessions of either active or control go/no-go training in which either high-energy density snack foods (active) or non-food stimuli (control) were associated with no-go signals. Participants' weight, energy intake (calculated from 24-h food diaries), daily snacking frequency and subjective food evaluations were measured for one week pre- and post-intervention. Participants also provided self-reported weight and monthly snacking frequency at pre-intervention screening, and one month and six months after completing the study. Participants in the active relative to control condition showed significant weight loss, reductions in daily energy intake and a reduction in rated liking of high-energy density (no-go) foods from the pre-to post-intervention week. There were no changes in self-reported daily snacking frequency. At longer-term follow-up, the active group showed significant reductions in self-reported weight at six months, whilst both groups reported significantly less snacking at one- and six-months. Excellent rates of adherence (97%) and positive feedback about the training suggest that this intervention is acceptable and has the potential to improve public health by reducing energy intake and overweight.

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