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Toxicological effect of emodin in mouse testicular gene expression profile.

Authors
  • Oshida, Keiyu
  • Hirakata, Mikito
  • Maeda, Akihisa
  • Miyoshi, Tomoya
  • Miyamoto, Yohei
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Applied Toxicology
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2011
Volume
31
Issue
8
Pages
790–800
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jat.1637
PMID: 21319176
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone) is a herbal medicine extracted from the rhizomes of Rheum palmatum, and is known as an inhibitor of casein kinase II (CK2). The CK2α' knockout mice are known to be male-infertile; however, there have been no reports on the toxicity of emodin in male reproductive organs/tissues. To evaluate the toxicological effects of emodin on differential gene expression profiles of the testis as compared with acrylamide, mice were orally administered emodin and acrylamide for 5 days at a dose of 1000 and 50 mg kg(-1) per day, respectively, and euthanized 24 h after the final administration. Both chemicals induced hypospermatogenesis, eosinophilic change and apoptosis of germ cell. A DNA microarray analysis showed that the IGF-1 receptor signaling was most closely related to the above testicular toxicity induced by emodin, and the RhoA regulation, TGF/WNT and cytoskeletal remodeling, TNFR1 signaling and adenosine A2A receptor signaling were commonly associated with the two chemicals. We selected 36 genes associated with CK2, apoptosis and spermatogenesis and determined their expression by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Both chemicals perturbed the expression of genes associated with CK2. Genes related to spermatogenesis were also affected, as evidenced by hypospermatogenesis, and eosinophilic change and apoptosis of germ cell. The results suggest that emodin causes testicular toxicity, including apoptosis with related the IGF-1 receptor signaling pathway, and the two chemicals commonly affect CK2, spermatogenesis and sperm motility via four pathways, such as TNFR1 signaling.

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