Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Toxicogenomic response of Mycobacterium bovis BCG to peracetic acid and a comparative analysis of the M. bovis BCG response to three oxidative disinfectants

Authors
  • Nde, Chantal W.1
  • Toghrol, Freshteh2
  • Jang, Hyeung-Jin3
  • Bentley, William E.1
  • 1 University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Center for Biosystems Research, College Park, MD, 20742, USA , College Park (United States)
  • 2 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Microarray Research Laboratory, Biological and Economic Analysis Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, Fort Meade, MD, 20755, USA , Fort Meade (United States)
  • 3 Kyung Hee University, College of Oriental Medicine, Seoul, South Korea , Seoul (South Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 28, 2010
Volume
90
Issue
1
Pages
277–304
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-2931-6
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and infects thousands of Americans annually. Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in humans and several animal species. Peracetic acid is an approved tuberculocide in hospital and domestic environments. This study presents for the first time the transcriptomic changes in M. bovis BCG after treatment with 0.1 mM peracetic acid for 10 and 20 min. This study also presents for the first time a comparison among the transcriptomic responses of M. bovis BCG to three oxidative disinfectants: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide after 10 min of treatment. Results indicate that arginine biosynthesis, virulence, and oxidative stress response genes were upregulated after both peracetic acid treatment times. Three DNA repair genes were downregulated after 10 and 20 min and cell wall component genes were upregulated after 20 min. The devR–devS signal transduction system was upregulated after 10 min, suggesting a role in the protection against peracetic acid treatment. Results also suggest that peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite both induce the expression of the ctpF gene which is upregulated in hypoxic environments. Further, this study reveals that in M. bovis BCG, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid both induce the expression of katG involved in oxidative stress response and the mbtD and mbtI genes involved in iron regulation/virulence.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times