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Total nasal airway resistance while sitting predicts airway collapse when lying down.

Authors
  • Karlsson, A1
  • Persson, M1
  • Mjörnheim, A-C1
  • Gudnadottir, G1
  • Hellgren, J1
  • 1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Laryngology & Otology
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Oct 27, 2020
Pages
1–8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0022215120002194
PMID: 33106191
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nasal obstruction when lying down is a common complaint in patients with chronic nasal obstruction, but rhinomanometry is typically performed in the sitting position. This study aimed to analyse whether adding rhinomanometry in a supine position is a useful examination. A total of 41 patients with chronic nasal obstruction underwent rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, sitting and supine, before and after decongestion, as well as an over-night polygraphy. Total airway resistance was measurable in a supine position in 48 per cent (14 of 29) of the patients with total airway resistance of equal to or less than 0.3 Pa/cm3/second when sitting and in none (0 of 12) of the patients with total nasal airway resistance of more than 0.3 Pa/cm3/second when sitting. After decongestion, this increased to 83 per cent and 58 per cent, respectively. Increased nasal resistance when sitting predicts nasal breathing problems when supine. Rhinomanometry in a supine position should be performed to diagnose upper airway collapse when supine.

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