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Tobacco use and HIV symptom severity in Chinese people living with HIV.

Authors
  • Chen, Wei-Ti1
  • Shiu, Chengshi1
  • Yang, Joyce P2, 3
  • Tun, Myo Mie Mie4
  • Zhang, Lin5
  • Wang, Kerong6
  • Chen, Li-Chen7
  • Aung, Myo Nyein8
  • Lu, Hongzhou5
  • Zhao, Hongxin6
  • 1 School of Nursing, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
  • 3 VA Palo Alto Health Care System, National Center for PTSD, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
  • 4 The Union, Integrated HIV Care (IHC) Program, Shan State, Myanmar. , (Myanmar (Burma))
  • 5 Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 6 Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 7 School of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
  • 8 Advanced Research Institute for Health Sciences and Faculty of International Liberal Arts, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
2
Pages
217–222
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2019.1620169
PMID: 31116021
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Exposure to nicotine among people living with HIV (PLWH) may impact physical health as indicated by experienced symptoms. Yet, the empirical evidence documenting the relations between tobacco use and symptom experiences among PLWH remains limited. This study aims to assess the relationships between tobacco use and HIV symptoms through a cross-sectional survey conducted in Beijing and Shanghai. The WHO ASSIST screening test was used for frequency of tobacco use. Sixty-four items from the revised signs and symptoms checklist for persons with HIV disease (SSC-HIVrev) were used. "Total number of symptoms" was created by summing all the binary coded and "Maximal symptom severity" was created by taking the maximal severity level across all symptoms for each participant. After controlling for confounding variables, tobacco use was not associated with the total number of symptom, yet was associated with the maximal symptom severity. This study documents the link between tobacco use and experienced symptoms among PLWH by demonstrating that higher frequency of tobacco use is associated with greater odds of reporting more severe symptoms. Smoking cessation strategies should be integrated into symptom management interventions for PLWH to optimize their effectiveness.

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