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Titanium metals form direct bonding to bone after alkali and heat treatments.

Authors
  • Nishiguchi, S
  • Kato, H
  • Fujita, H
  • Oka, M
  • Kim, H M
  • Kokubo, T
  • Nakamura, T
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biomaterials
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2001
Volume
22
Issue
18
Pages
2525–2533
Identifiers
PMID: 11516085
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In this article we evaluated the bone-bonding strengths of titanium and titanium alloy implants with and without alkali and heat treatments using the conventional canine femur push-out model. Four kinds of smooth cylindrical implants, made of pure titanium or three titanium alloys, were prepared with and without alkali and heat treatments. The implants were inserted hemitranscortically into canine femora. The bone-bonding shear strengths of the implants were measured using push-out test. At 4 weeks all types of the alkali- and heat-treated implants showed significantly higher bonding strength (2.4-4.5 MPa) than their untreated counterparts (0.3-0.6 MPa). At 12 weeks the bonding strengths of the treated implants showed no further increase, while those of the untreated implants had increased to 0.6-1.2MPa. Histologically, alkali- and heat-treated implants showed direct bonding to bony tissue without intervening fibrous tissue. On the other hand, untreated implants usually had intervening fibrous tissue at the interface between bone and the implant. The early and strong bonding to bone of alkali- and heat-treated titanium and its alloys without intervening fibrous tissue may be useful in establishing cementless stable fixation of orthopedic implants.

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