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Titanium dioxide nanorod-based amperometric sensor for highly sensitive enzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide

Authors
  • Li, Qian1
  • Cheng, Kui1
  • Weng, Wenjian1, 2
  • Du, Piyi1
  • Han, Gaorong1
  • 1 Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Hangzhou, 310027, China , Hangzhou (China)
  • 2 The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai, 200050, China , Shanghai (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Microchimica Acta
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 03, 2013
Volume
180
Issue
15-16
Pages
1487–1493
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00604-013-1077-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Titanium dioxide nanorods (TNR) were grown on a titanium electrode by a hydrothermal route and further employed as a supporting matrix for the immobilization of nafion-coated horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The strong electrostatic interaction between HRP and TNR favors the adsorption of HRP and facilitates direct electron transfer on the electrode. The electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated via cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. The biosensor exhibits fast response, a high sensitivity (416.9 μA·mM−1), a wide linear response range (2.5 nM to 0.46 mM), a detection limit as low as 12 nM, and a small apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (33.6 μM). The results indicate that this method is a promising technique for enzyme immobilization and for the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors. FigureA TiO2 nanorod film was directly grown on Ti substrate by a hydrothermal route, and was further employed for a supporting matrix to immobilize horseradish peroxidase as a biosensor electrode. The as-prepared hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on Nafion/HRP/TNR/Ti electrode exhibited fast response and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H2O2, i.e., a high sensitivity (416.9 μA mM−1), a wide linear range (2.5 × 10−8 to 4.6 × 10−4 M) with a low detection limit (0.012 μM) and a small apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (33.6 μM).

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