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Timing of spring xylogenesis in temperate deciduous tree species relates to tree growth characteristics and previous autumn phenology.

Authors
  • Marchand, Lorène Julia1, 2
  • Dox, Inge1
  • Gričar, Jožica3
  • Prislan, Peter3
  • Van den Bulcke, Jan4
  • Fonti, Patrick5
  • Campioli, Matteo1
  • 1 Research Group PLECO (Plants and Ecosystems), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitplan 1, 2160 Wilrijk, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 2 UMR 6553 ECOBIO (Ecosystèmes, Biodiversité, Evolution), Université de Rennes 1, CNRS, 263 Av. du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes, France. , (France)
  • 3 Department of Yield and Silviculture, Slovenian Forestry Institute, Vecna pot 2, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia. , (Slovenia)
  • 4 Laboratory of Wood Technology, UGent-Woodlab, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 5 Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zürcherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tree Physiology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Jul 05, 2021
Volume
41
Issue
7
Pages
1161–1170
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpaa171
PMID: 33367844
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

We explored the timing of spring xylogenesis and its potential drivers in homogeneous mature forest stands in a temperate European region. Three species with contrasting leaf development dynamics and wood anatomy were studied: European beech, silver birch and pedunculate oak. Detailed phenological observations of xylogenesis and leaf phenology were performed from summer 2017 until spring 2018. Cambium reactivation (CR) occurred before the buds of oak and birch were swollen, whereas these two phenological phases were concurrent for beech. On the other hand, initial earlywood vessels were fully differentiated (FDIEV) after leaf unfolding for all three species. Timing of CR was correlated to average ring-width of the last 10 years (2008-17), tree diameter and, partially, with tree age. In addition, the timing of FDIEV was correlated to tree age and previous year's autumn phenology, i.e., timing of wood growth cessation and onset of leaf senescence. Multivariate models could explain up to 68% of the variability of CR and 55% of the variability of FDIEV. In addition to the 'species' factor, the variability could be explained by ca 30% by tree characteristics and previous year's autumn phenology for both CR and FDIEV. These findings are important to better identify which factors (other than environment) can be driving the onset of the growing season, and highlight the influence of tree growth characteristics and previous year's phenology on spring wood phenology, wood formation and, potentially, forest production. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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