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Time Waits for No One: Longitudinal Study on the Effects of an Anti-Stigma Seminar on the Psychology Student Population.

Authors
  • Pingani, Luca1, 2, 3
  • Evans-Lacko, Sara4, 5
  • Coriani, Sandra2
  • Ferrari, Silvia1
  • Filosa, Maria6
  • Galeazzi, Gian Maria1, 3
  • Lorenzini, Mattia1
  • Manari, Tommaso7
  • Musetti, Alessandro7
  • Nasi, Anna Maria2, 3
  • Franceschini, Christian6
  • 1 Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Department of Health Professions, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 3 Department of Mental Health, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 Care Policy Evaluation Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, London WC2A 2AE, UK.
  • 5 Centre for Global Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK.
  • 6 Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43125 Parma, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 7 Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Cultural Industries, University of Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
May 19, 2021
Volume
18
Issue
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18105441
PMID: 34069628
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The primary aim is to describe the changes in the knowledge of mental health conditions, the attitudes toward the mentally ill, and the intended behaviour towards people with mental illness among the entire student population of the third year of a degree course in Psychology. A total of 570 students attended a seminar on stigma towards mental illness and were invited to complete an online survey which collected data on sociodemographic characteristics and three validated questionnaires evaluating different aspects of stigma at three different time points (pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at one year follow up). A total of 253 students (44.39%) completed the questionnaires at t0, t1, and t2. The mean age of the sample was 23.7 (SD = ±5.89), and 86.96% (n = 220) were females. Between t0 and t1, a statistically significant improvement was observed for all three outcomes, while the intended behaviour outcome was no longer significant between t1 and t2 (Z = -0.70; p = 0.48). Females and who participated live at the seminar maintained a significant knowledge of mental illness and a better attitude toward community mental health care. The effects of the seminar focused on reducing stigma tended to diminish over time at one year follow-up, particular in relation to intended behaviour.

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