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Time to develop more clinician-educators in allergy and immunology.

Authors
  • Pien, Lily C1
  • Colbert, Colleen Y2
  • 1 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio; Education Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio; Education Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
145
Issue
2
Pages
456–462
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.12.008
PMID: 31863807
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Clinician-educators in the field of allergy and immunology (A/I) in the United States teach and assess trainees (medical students, residents, and fellows), provide professional development to primary care physicians and advance practice providers, and are essential in developing a pipeline of academic A/I specialists. According to data from Doximity and the Association of American Medical Colleges, the United States appears to be facing a shortage of clinician-educators and academic allergists in A/I. Without adequate numbers of A/I specialists focused on medical education, institutions will find it difficult to train fellows and introduce the field of A/I to medical students and residents. It is now imperative that the field focus on empowering more A/I specialists to become clinical teachers and clinician-educators. There are specific strategies that individuals, as active agents in their own development, can take in planning for this rewarding and fulfilling career. Individuals can pursue professional development opportunities, join medical education communities of practice, seek education mentors, and join in scholarship activities. It is also essential that systems-level support be provided for clinician-educators, given the increasing business pressures in medicine. Academic institutions, national organizations, and professional societies can provide resources, including structured programs in medical education, protected time, and grants. This article outlines strategies for individuals, institutions, and professional organizations that will promote the development of the next generation of A/I clinician-educators. Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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