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Thyroid function, reduced kidney function and incident chronic kidney disease in a community-based population: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

Authors
  • Schultheiss, Ulla T1, 2
  • Daya, Natalie3
  • Grams, Morgan E3, 4
  • Seufert, Jochen5
  • Steffes, Michael6
  • Coresh, Josef3
  • Selvin, Elizabeth3
  • Köttgen, Anna1, 2, 3
  • 1 Renal Division, Department of Medicine IV, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Division of Genetic Epidemiology, Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 4 Division of Nephrology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 5 Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Medicine II, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 6 Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2017
Volume
32
Issue
11
Pages
1874–1881
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/ndt/gfw301
PMID: 27540046
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Elevated TSH, FT4 and reduced T3 concentrations were associated with reduced kidney function cross-sectionally. The lack of association with the development of incident CKD suggests that altered thyroid function in the general population is not causally related to CKD development, but screening for thyroidal status may be especially relevant in persons with reduced kidney function.

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