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Three-dimensional printing in congenital heart disease: Considerations on training and clinical implementation from a teaching session.

Authors
  • Biglino, Giovanni1, 2
  • Milano, Elena G3, 4
  • Capelli, Claudio3, 5
  • Wray, Jo5
  • Shearn, Andrew Iu1
  • Caputo, Massimo1, 6
  • Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara1, 6
  • Taylor, Andrew M3, 5
  • Schievano, Silvia3, 5
  • 1 Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
  • 2 National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK.
  • 3 Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, UK.
  • 4 Department of Surgery, Dentistry, Paediatrics and Obstetrics/Gynaecology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 5 Cardiorespiratory Division, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
  • 6 University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The International Journal of Artificial Organs
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
42
Issue
10
Pages
595–599
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0391398819849074
PMID: 31104546
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In light of growing interest for three-dimensional printing technology in the cardiovascular community, this study focused on exploring the possibilities of providing training for cardiovascular three-dimensional printing in the context of a relevant international congress and providing considerations on the delivery of such courses. As a second objective, the study sought to capture preferences in relation to three-dimensional printing uses and set-ups from those attending the training session. A survey was administered to n = 30 professionals involved or interested in three-dimensional printing cardiovascular models following a specialised teaching session. Survey results suggest the potential for split training sessions, with a broader introduction for those with no prior experience in three-dimensional printing followed by a more in-depth and hands-on session. All participants agreed on the potential of the technology in all its applications, particularly for aiding decision-making around complex surgical or interventional cases. When exploring setting up an in-house three-dimensional printing service, the majority of participants reported that their centre was already equipped with an in-house facility or expressed a desire that such a facility should be available, with a minority preferring consigning models to an external third party for printing.

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