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Threats to embodied well-being: An exploration of how disabled people negotiate barriers in hospital settings.

Authors
  • Bailey, Ruth1
  • Lowton, Karen2
  • Scambler, Sasha1
  • 1 King's College London, UK.
  • 2 University of Sussex, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Health (London, England : 1997)
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
24
Issue
5
Pages
535–551
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1363459318820097
PMID: 30606063
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Taking a social model of disability approach, this article explores how disabled people negotiate barriers in the large, modern hospital settings typically found in complex healthcare systems. While there is evidence of intractable barriers in the United Kingdom's National Health Service, little is known about the actions disabled people take in the face of barriers and the immediate effects of doing so. Analysis of data from a qualitative study of disabled people's healthcare encounters is presented. This draws on the concept of threats to embodied well-being to understand how disabled people perceive barriers and the influence this perception has on barrier negotiation. It demonstrates that some barriers are unique to healthcare and that these place disabled people in situations where their well-being is threatened. Despite these situations being inherently disempowering, disabled people are forced to take whatever action they can to protect the embodied self. We theorise that barriers are created inadvertently by the design, organisation and healthcare practices characteristics of modern hospital settings. Effective barrier removal requires understanding not only their impact on disabled people's embodied well-being, but also the political, policy and social relations implicated in their creation.

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