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Thelaziosis due to Thelazia callipaeda in Europe in the 21st century-A review.

Authors
  • do Vale, Beatriz1
  • Lopes, Ana Patrícia2
  • da Conceição Fontes, Maria2
  • Silvestre, Mário3
  • Cardoso, Luís4
  • Coelho, Ana Cláudia2
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Sciences, School of Agrarian and Veterinary Sciences (ECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Vila Real, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 2 Department of Veterinary Sciences, School of Agrarian and Veterinary Sciences (ECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Vila Real, Portugal; Animal and Veterinary Research Centre, UTAD, Vila Real, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 3 Animal and Veterinary Research Centre, UTAD, Vila Real, Portugal; Department of Zootechnics, ECAV, UTAD, Vila Real, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 4 Department of Veterinary Sciences, School of Agrarian and Veterinary Sciences (ECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Vila Real, Portugal; Animal and Veterinary Research Centre, UTAD, Vila Real, Portugal. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Portugal)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Veterinary parasitology
Publication Date
Oct 13, 2019
Volume
275
Pages
108957–108957
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2019.108957
PMID: 31630050
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Thelazia callipaeda was first described at the beginning of the 20th century in Asia, but this eyeworm is now frequently reported in Europe in the 21st century. To date, thelaziosis has been described in the following European countries (in order of appearance): Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Greece, Bulgaria, Hungary, Slovakia, the United Kingdom, Turkey and Austria. The infected vertebrate host species include domestic carnivores (dogs and cats), wild carnivores (red foxes, wolves, beech martens, wildcats and golden jackals), lagomorphs (brown hares and wild European rabbits) and humans. In Europe, 11 cases of human thelaziosis have been reported, the majority of which are autochthonous. However, some of them have been imported, a fact which highlights the importance of surveillance policies to restrict cross-border spread of the parasite. The objectives of this article are to review key aspects of the epidemiology of T. callipaeda, summarise animal and human cases in Europe and emphasise the importance of education and awareness among veterinarians, physicians (particularly ophthalmologists) and animal, in order to owners to tackle this zoonosis. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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