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Theiler's virus persistence and demyelination in major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice.

Authors
  • Njenga, M K
  • Pavelko, K D
  • Baisch, J
  • Lin, X
  • David, C
  • Leibowitz, J
  • Rodriguez, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of virology
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1996
Volume
70
Issue
3
Pages
1729–1737
Identifiers
PMID: 8627694
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mice with targeted disruption of the A beta gene of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (Abo) were used to investigate the role of class II gene products in resistance or susceptibility to virus-induced chronic demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). Class-II-deficient mice from the resistant H-2b [H-2b(Abo)] and nonmutant H-2b backgrounds were infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus intracerebrally and examined for CNS virus persistence, demyelination, and neurologic clinical signs. Virus titers measured by plaque assays showed that 8 of 10 normally resistant nonmutant H-2b mice had cleared the virus within 21 days, whereas the other 2 mice had low titers. In contrast, all class II-deficient Abo mice had high virus titers for up to 90 days after infection (4.30 log10 PFU per g of CNS tissue). Virus antigens and RNA were localized to the brains (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and brain stem) and spinal cords of Abo mice. Colocalization identified persistent Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus in oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but not in macrophages. There was demyelination in 11 of 23 and 6 of 9 Abo mice 45 and 90 days after virus infection, respectively, whereas no demyelination was observed in infected nonmutant H-2b mice. Demyelinating lesions in Abo mice showed virus-specific CD8+ T cells and macrophages but no CD4+ T cells. Spasticity and paralysis were observed in chronically infected Abo mice but not in the nonmutant H-2b mice. These findings demonstrate that class II gene products are required for virus clearance from the CNS but not for demyelination and neurologic disease.

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