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The Effects of Salicylic Acid and Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection on the Alternative Oxidase of Tobacco.

Authors
  • A. M. Lennon
  • U. H. Neuenschwander
  • M. Ribas-Carbo
  • L. Giles
  • J. A. Ryals
  • J. N. Siedow
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1997
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Biology
License
Unknown

Abstract

Salicylic acid (SA) is a signal in systemic acquired resistance and an inducer of the alternative oxidase protein in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi nc) cell suspensions and during thermogenesis in aroid spadices. The effects of SA on the levels of alternative oxidase protein and the pathogenesis-related 1a mRNA (a marker for systemic acquired resistance), and on the partitioning of electrons between the Cyt and alternative pathways were investigated in tobacco. Leaves were treated with 1.0 mM SA and mitochondria isolated at times between 1 h and 3 d after treatment. Alternative oxidase protein increased 2.5-fold within 5 h, reached a maximum (9-fold) after 12 h, and remained at twice the level of control plants after 3 d. Measurements of isotope fractionation of 18O by intact leaf tissue gave a value of 23% at all times, identical to that of control plants, indicating a constant 27 to 30% of electron-flow partitioning to the alternative oxidase independent of treatment with SA. Transgenic NahG tobacco plants that express bacterial salicylate hydroxylase and possess very low levels of SA gave a fractionation of 23% and showed control levels of alternative oxidase protein, suggesting that steady-state alternative oxidase accumulates in an SA-independent manner. Infection of plants with tobacco mosaic virus resulted in an increase in alternative oxidase protein in both infected and systemic leaves, but no increase was observed in comparably infected NahG plants. Total respiration rate and partitioning of electrons to the alternative pathway in virus-infected plants was comparable to that in uninfected controls.

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