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The effects of changes in physical fitness on academic performance among New York City youth.

Authors
  • Bezold, Carla P1
  • Konty, Kevin J2
  • Day, Sophia E3
  • Berger, Magdalena4
  • Harr, Lindsey5
  • Larkin, Michael5
  • Napier, Melanie D6
  • Nonas, Cathy7
  • Saha, Subir5
  • Harris, Tiffany G3
  • Stark, James H8
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • 2 Division of Epidemiology, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Division of Epidemiology, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York.
  • 4 Healthfirst, New York, New York.
  • 5 Office of School Wellness Programs, New York City Department of Education, New York, New York.
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
  • 7 Division of the First Deputy Commissioner, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York.
  • 8 Department of Epidemiology, Pfizer, New York, New York.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Publication Date
December 2014
Volume
55
Issue
6
Pages
774–781
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.06.006
PMID: 25088395
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Academic rankings improved for boys and girls who increased their fitness level by >20 percentile points compared to other students. Opportunities for increased physical fitness may be important to support academic performance.

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