Affordable Access

The association of patient trust and self-care among patients with diabetes mellitus

Authors
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Medicine
  • Psychology

Abstract

1471-2296-5-26.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Family Practice Open AcceResearch article The association of patient trust and self-care among patients with diabetes mellitus Denise E Bonds*1,2, Fabian Camacho1, Ronny A Bell1, Vanessa T Duren- Winfield3, Roger T Anderson1 and David C Goff1,2 Address: 1Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA and 3Maya Angelou Center for Minority Health, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Email: Denise E Bonds* - [email protected]; Fabian Camacho - [email protected]; Ronny A Bell - [email protected]; Vanessa T Duren-Winfield - [email protected]; Roger T Anderson - [email protected]; David C Goff - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Diabetes requires significant alterations to lifestyle and completion of self management tasks to obtain good control of disease. The objective of this study was to determine if patient trust is associated with reduced difficulty and hassles in altering lifestyle and completing self care tasks. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone survey and medical record review was performed to measure patient trust and difficulty in completing diabetes tasks among 320 medically underserved patients attending diabetes programs in rural North Carolina, USA. Diabetes tasks were measured three ways: perceived hassles of diabetic care activities, difficulty in completing diabetes-related care activities, and a global assessment of overall ability to complete diabetes care activities. The association of patient trust with self-management was examined after controlling for patient demographics, physical functioning, mental health and co-morbidities. Results: Level of patient trust was high (median 22, possible max 25). Higher trust levels were associated with lower levels of hassles (p = 0.006) and lower difficul

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments