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The test-retest reliability of questionnaires regarding attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices in young adults.

Authors
  • Degeest, Sofie1
  • Maes, Leen1
  • Leyssens, Laura1
  • Keppler, Hannah1
  • 1 Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Noise & health
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
20
Issue
93
Pages
31–36
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4103/nah.NAH_41_17
PMID: 29676292
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Young people expose themselves to high noise levels during leisure activities, and might thus be at risk of acquiring hearing-related problems. Therefore, information regarding risk-taking behavior is necessary to prevent future hearing problems and to optimize future preventive campaigns. This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of the Youth Attitude to Noise Scale (YANS) and beliefs about hearing protection and hearing loss (BAHPHL) instrument. Forty-three young adults between 18 and 29 years filled in a questionnaire at two test moments. The YANS and BAHPHL instrument were used to evaluate the attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protection. Each participant completed the retest within 21-55 days after the first administration of the questionnaire. Paired Student's t-tests showed no significant differences in mean scores between test and retest for both the entire YANS and BAHPHL instrument as well as their factors. Furthermore, a good agreement between test and retest scores was seen by Bland-Altman analyses. Intraclass correlation coefficients were above 0.70 for the entire YANS and the factor related to youth culture as well as for the entire BAHPHL and all the factors of the BAHPHL instrument, except for the factor related to the severity of the consequences of hearing loss. Reliable test-retest measurements of the YANS and BAHPHL instrument can be performed. Hence, these questionnaires can be used in longitudinal studies to explore young adults' changes in attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protection, with or without an educational intervention.

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