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Testing the higher-level phylogenetic classification of Digenea (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda) based on nuclear rDNA sequences before entering the age of the 'next-generation' Tree of Life.

Authors
  • Pérez-Ponce de León, G1
  • Hernández-Mena, D I1
  • 1 Departamento de Zoología,Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,Avenida Universidad 3000,Ciudad Universitaria,C.P. 04510,México, D.F.,Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of helminthology
Publication Date
May 01, 2019
Volume
93
Issue
3
Pages
260–276
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0022149X19000191
PMID: 30973318
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Digenea Carus, 1863 represent a highly diverse group of parasitic platyhelminths that infect all major vertebrate groups as definitive hosts. Morphology is the cornerstone of digenean systematics, but molecular markers have been instrumental in searching for a stable classification system of the subclass and in establishing more accurate species limits. The first comprehensive molecular phylogenetic tree of Digenea published in 2003 used two nuclear rRNA genes (ssrDNA = 18S rDNA and lsrDNA = 28S rDNA) and was based on 163 taxa representing 77 nominal families, resulting in a widely accepted phylogenetic classification. The genetic library for the 28S rRNA gene has increased steadily over the last 15 years because this marker possesses a strong phylogenetic signal to resolve sister-group relationships among species and to infer phylogenetic relationships at higher levels of the taxonomic hierarchy. Here, we have updated the database of 18S and 28S rRNA genes until December 2017, we have added newly generated 28S rDNA sequences and we have reassessed phylogenetic relationships to test the current higher-level classification of digeneans (at the subordinal and subfamilial levels). The new dataset consisted of 1077 digenean taxa allocated to 106 nominal families for 28S and 419 taxa in 98 families for 18S. Overall, the results were consistent with previous higher-level classification schemes, and most superfamilies and suborders were recovered as monophyletic assemblages. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, new phylogenetic hypotheses from complete mitochondrial genomes have been proposed, although their power to resolve deep levels of trees remains controversial. Since data from NGS methods are replacing other widely used markers for phylogenetic analyses, it is timely to reassess the phylogenetic relationships of digeneans with conventional nuclear rRNA genes, and to use the new analysis to test the performance of genomic information gathered from NGS, e.g. mitogenomes, to infer higher-level relationships of this group of parasitic platyhelminths.

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