Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Temporal dynamics of the association between financial stress and depressive symptoms throughout the emerging adulthood.

Authors
  • Cao, Hongjian1
  • Zhou, Nan2
  • Li, Xiaomin3
  • Serido, Joyce4
  • Shim, Soyeon5
  • 1 Institute of Early Childhood Education, Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. 512 Ying Dong Building, No. 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai Street, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100875, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 Department of Educational Psychology and School Counseling, Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. 528 Ying Dong Building, No. 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai Street, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100875, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 3 Department of Family Studies and Human Development, University of Arizona, 650 N. Park Avenue PO Box 210078, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0078, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 4 Department of Family Social Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 299b McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Ave, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 5 School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Office 2135, Nancy Nicholas Hall, 1300 Linden Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of affective disorders
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
282
Pages
211–218
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.12.166
PMID: 33418369
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Emerging adulthood is a life stage with elevated risk for both mental disorders and financial distress. Although a positive link between financial stress and depressive symptoms has been identified, there is a lack of delineation on the temporal dynamics of this link spanning the entire stage of emerging adulthood (roughly ages 18 to 29). Using a statistical approach that partitions between-person from within-person variation and based on four waves of data from a college cohort (N = 2,098) throughout emerging adulthood, this study addresses this gap. Latent growth curve model analyses indicate that the trajectory of financial stress throughout emerging adulthood followed an inverted "U" shape, whereas that of depressive symptoms displayed a linear, decreasing trend. The positive correlations of both intercepts and slopes between financial stress and depressive symptoms indicated a co-development pattern. Classical, cross-lagged panel model analyses (i.e., a model aggregating between-person and within-person variation) demonstrated a reciprocal positive association between financial stress and depressive symptoms across waves. Random intercept, cross-lagged panel model analyses (i.e., a model disaggregating between-person and within-person effects) indicated a unidirectional positive within-person effect from depressive symptoms to financial stress across waves, controlling for between-person effects. Shared-method and shared-informant variance may inflate the identified associations, and the correlational data precludes casual inferences. Improving young adults' mental well-being, specifically intervening depressive symptoms, could be an avenue for reducing their financial stress. Future research is pressing to examine mechanisms via which depression symptoms manifest as financial stress during transition to adulthood. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times