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Temperature dependence of vesicular dynamics at excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus.

Authors
  • Bui, Loc1
  • Glavinović, Mladen I1
  • 1 Department of Physiology, McGill University, 3655 Sir William Osler Promenade, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6 Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cognitive neurodynamics
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2014
Volume
8
Issue
4
Pages
277–286
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11571-014-9283-3
PMID: 25009670
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

How vesicular dynamics parameters depend on temperature and how temperature affects the parameter change during prolonged high frequency stimulation was determined by fitting a model of vesicular storage and release to the amplitudes of the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSC) recorded from CA1 neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The temperature ranged from low (13 °C) to higher and more physiological temperature (34 °C). Fitting the model of vesicular storage and release to the EPSC amplitudes during a single pair of brief high-low frequency stimulation trains yields the estimates of all parameters of the vesicular dynamics, and with good precision. Both fractional release and replenishment rate decrease as the temperature rises. Change of the underlying 'basic' parameters (release coupling, replenishment coupling and readily releasable pool size), which the model-fitting also yields is complex. The replenishment coupling between the readily releasable pool (RRP) and resting pool increases with temperature (which renders the replenishment rate higher), but this is more than counterbalanced by greater RRP size (which renders the replenishment rate lower). Finally, during long, high frequency patterned stimulation that leads to significant synaptic depression, the replenishment rate decreases markedly and rapidly at low temperatures (<22 °C), but at high temperatures (>28 °C) the replenishment rate rises with stimulation, making synapses better able to maintain synaptic efficacy.

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