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Temperature dependence of blood viscosity in frogs and turtles: effect on heat exchange with environment.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of physiology
Publication Date
Volume
239
Issue
3
Identifiers
PMID: 6969031
Source
Medline

Abstract

The temperature dependence of the viscosity of blood from frogs and turtles has been assessed for temperatures between 5 and 40 degrees C. Viscosity of turtles' blood was, on average, reduced from 3.50 +/- 0.16 to 2.13 +/- 0.10 cP between 10 and 30 degrees C, a decline of 39%. Even larger changes in viscosity were observed for frogs' blood with viscosity falling from 4.55 +/- 0.32 to 2.55 +/- 0.25 cP over the same temperature range, a change of 44%. Blood viscosity was highly correlated with hematocrit in both species at all temperatures. Viscosity of blood from both frogs and turtles showed a large standard deviation at all temperatures and this was attributed to large individual-to-individual variations in hematocrit. Turtles heat faster than they cool, regardless of whether tests are performed at temperatures above or below the range of thermal preference. The effect of temperature dependence of blood viscosity on heating and cooling rates is demonstrated.

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