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Teaching Patient Safety Using an Interprofessional Team-Based Learning Simulation Model in Residency Training

Authors
  • Lu, Wei-Hsin1
  • Goolsarran, Nirvani2, 3
  • Hamo, Carine E.4
  • Frawley, Stacey M.5, 6
  • Rowe, Colby7, 8
  • Lane, Susan9, 10, 11
  • 1 Research Assistant Professor, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 2 Academic Hospitalist, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 3 Associate Program Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 4 Internal Medicine Resident, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 5 Clinical Associate Professor, Stony Brook University School of Nursing
  • 6 Program Director, Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Programs, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 7 Clinical Simulation Program Coordinator, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 8 Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 9 Program Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 10 Vice Chair of Education, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • 11 Associate Professor of Medicine, Stony Brook University School of Medicine
Type
Published Article
Journal
MedEdPORTAL : the Journal of Teaching and Learning Resources
Publisher
Association of American Medical Colleges
Publication Date
Jun 03, 2016
Volume
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10409
PMID: 31008189
PMCID: PMC6464414
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Introduction Teaching and learning patient safety require demonstration of competencies such as teamwork, communication skills, and recognition of systems error. This patient safety TBL simulation-training program was developed to fulfill core patient safety objectives outlined by the ACGME and ACGME Clinical Learning Environment Review Program. The goal of the program is to enhance patient safety and quality care concepts and facilitate hands-on teamwork skills and core attitudes towards patient safety. This program served as a mandatory part of the residency core curriculum. Methods It was delivered as a 3-hour workshop session during medicine resident orientation. The workshop included an introductory presentation, one TBL activity, and three 1-hour interprofessional simulated application cases using either high-fidelity mannequins or standardized patients. Following each application case activity, trainees participated in a postcase scenario debriefing moderated by faculty facilitators. Results A total of 76 trainees participated, and 20 interprofessional teams were created. An independent-samples t test revealed that the Group Readiness Assurance Test scores were significantly higher than the Individual Readiness Assurance Test scores. Although the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Survey's Teamwork and Professional Identity subscale scores were higher postworkshop compared to preworkshop, the differences were not statistically significant. Over 90% of the participants agreed that the safety concepts they learned would likely improve the quality of care they provide to future patients. Discussion A simulation model centered on an interprofessional team can be used as an important training technique to teach health care professionals realistic, hands-on principles of patient safety.

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