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Teachers' quality of work life and attitudes toward implementing a psychosocial intervention for children affected by parental HIV/AIDS: roles of self-efficacy and burnout.

Authors
  • Li, Qianfeng1
  • Li, Xiaoming2
  • Wang, Fang3
  • Zhao, Junfeng4
  • Zhao, Guoxiang5
  • Chen, Lihua1
  • Du, Hongfei6
  • Chi, Peilian1
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Macau, Macao, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Health Promotion, Education & Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
  • 3 College of Education Science, Jilin Normal University, Siping, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 4 Department of Psychology, Institute or Behavior and Psychology, Henan University, Kaifeng, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 5 Faculty of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 6 Department of Psychology, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
9
Pages
1125–1132
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2020.1757606
PMID: 32362130
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

ABSTRACT Several studies have highlighted that facilitators' attitudes toward interventions are crucial for implementing innovative psychosocial interventions. However, in the emerging implementation science field, little research has examined how organizational and individual factors may influence teachers' positive attitudes and readiness toward evidence-based interventions. The current study investigated the association between teachers' quality of work life and their attitudes toward an innovative psychosocial intervention for children affected by parental HIV/AIDS; the study also probed the potential indirect roles of self-efficacy and burnout. A total of 157 teachers with different levels of involvement in the intervention study were recruited from 47 schools. Our results revealed that teachers' quality of work life was positively associated with their attitudes toward the intervention directly and indirectly through enhanced self-efficacy and reduced burnout. The findings highlight the importance of organizational and individual factors in successfully implementing innovative psychosocial interventions for vulnerable children in organizations such as schools. Researchers should work with organizations to provide the necessary quality of work life and sufficient training to semi-professionals in order to boost their self-efficacy, reduce their burnout, and improve their attitudes toward innovative intervention programs to achieve the expected effectiveness of the interventions, particularly in resource-limited regions.

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