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Task utility and norms for the Preschool Executive Task Assessment (PETA).

Authors
  • Downes, Michelle1, 2
  • Berg, Christine3
  • Kirkham, Fenella J2
  • Kischkel, Laura2
  • McMurray, Imogen2
  • de Haan, Michelle2
  • 1 a School of Psychology , University College Dublin , Dublin , Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 2 b Developmental Neurosciences , UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health , London , UK.
  • 3 c Program in Occupational Therapy , Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis , MO , USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child Neuropsychology
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2018
Volume
24
Issue
6
Pages
784–798
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09297049.2017.1333092
PMID: 28565996
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Earlier identification of executive deficits in preschool children using an ecological approach would give more scope for intervention. The Preschool Executive Task Assessment (PETA) was developed to resemble an everyday age-appropriate task in order to examine the self-direction and integration of executive functions during a multistep task. It was designed so that performance can be evaluated in a microanalytic way and so individualized feedback and support can be easily communicated. The utility of the PETA was assessed with 166 three-to five-year olds. Results showed improved performance with increasing age and verbal intellectual quotient as well as good task reliability and utility. Evidence for influence of socioeconomic status, gender, and use of self-talk was also observed. Clinical applications and future directions of this novel measure are discussed.

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