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Talker variability and recognition memory: instance-specific and voice-specific effects.

Authors
  • Goh, Winston D
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2005
Volume
31
Issue
1
Pages
40–53
Identifiers
PMID: 15641903
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The author investigated voice context effects in recognition memory for words spoken by multiple talkers by comparing performance when studied words were repeated with same, different, or new voices at test. Hits and false alarms increased when words were tested with studied voices compared with unstudied voices. Discrimination increased only when the exact same voice was used. A trend toward conservatism in response bias was observed when test words switched to increasingly unfamiliar voices. Taken together, the overall findings suggest that the voice-specific attributes of individual talkers are preserved in long-term memory. Implications for the role of instance-specific matching and voice-specific familiarity processes and the nature of spoken-word representation are discussed.

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