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T Cell Repertoire Diversity Is Decreased in Type 1 Diabetes Patients.

Authors
  • Tong, Yin1
  • Li, Zhoufang1
  • Zhang, Hua2
  • Xia, Ligang3
  • Zhang, Meng1
  • Xu, Ying4
  • Wang, Zhanhui4
  • Deem, Michael W5
  • Sun, Xiaojuan6
  • He, Jiankui7
  • 1 Department of Biology, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055, China.
  • 2 Department of Endocrinology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510280, China.
  • 3 Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Shenzhen People's Hospital, the Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen 518020, China.
  • 4 Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology Unit, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.
  • 5 Departments of Bioengineering and Physics & Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.
  • 6 Shenzhen Tumor Immune-Gene Therapy Clinical Application Engineering Lab, Biobank of the Second People's Hospital, the First Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518035, China. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 7 Department of Biology, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055, China. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Genomics, proteomics & bioinformatics
Publication Date
Dec 23, 2016
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.gpb.2016.10.003
PMID: 28024918
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease. The autoreactive T cells in T1D patients attack and destroy their own pancreatic cells. In order to systematically investigate the potential autoreactive T cell receptors (TCRs), we used a high-throughput immune repertoire sequencing technique to profile the spectrum of TCRs in individual T1D patients and controls. We sequenced the T cell repertoire of nine T1D patients, four type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, and six nondiabetic controls. The diversity of the T cell repertoire in T1D patients was significantly decreased in comparison with T2D patients (P=7.0E-08 for CD4+ T cells, P=1.4E-04 for CD8+ T cells) and nondiabetic controls (P=2.7E-09 for CD4+ T cells, P=7.6E-06 for CD8+ T cells). Moreover, T1D patients had significantly more highly-expanded T cell clones than T2D patients (P=5.2E-06 for CD4+ T cells, P=1.9E-07 for CD8+ T cells) and nondiabetic controls (P=1.7E-07 for CD4+ T cells, P=3.3E-03 for CD8+ T cells). Furthermore, we identified a group of highly-expanded T cell receptor clones that are shared by more than two T1D patients. Although further validation in larger cohorts is needed, our data suggest that T cell receptor diversity measurements may become a valuable tool in investigating diabetes, such as using the diversity as an index to distinguish different types of diabetes.

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