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Synthesis of sterols by chick brain and liver during embryonic development.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurochemistry International
0197-0186
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
1
Pages
131–135
Identifiers
PMID: 20492908
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The evolution throughout embryonic development of the rate at which acetate was converted into sterols was studied in chick brain and liver. Acetate incorporation (nmol/h/g tissue) was clearly higher in brain than in liver and sharply decreased with the age of embryo. Cholesterol and desmosterol were the major sterols formed from acetate by chick embryo brain, followed by lanosterol and squalene. No desmosterol was found in chick embryo liver, organ where cholesterol was the major sterol synthesized. In brain, the relative percentage of cholesterol increased throughout embryonic development reaching more than 50% at hatching, while the percentage of desmosterol decreased during the same period and represented at hatching only about 10-15% of the total nonsaponifiable fraction. The relative percentages of lanosterol and squalene did not change significantly throughout the period assayed. In liver, the percentage of cholesterol increased until 19 days but sharply decreased at hatching.

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