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Synergistic effect of Klebsiella sp. FH-1 and Arthrobacter sp. NJ-1 on the growth of the microbiota in the black soil of Northeast China.

Authors
  • Zhang, Jinpeng1
  • Xu, Yuncheng1
  • Liang, Shuang1
  • Ma, Xiulan1
  • Lu, Zhongbin1
  • Sun, Peng2
  • Zhang, Hao3
  • Sun, Fengjie4
  • 1 College of Resource and Environment, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, 130118, PR China. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Computer Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
  • 3 College of Resource and Environment, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, 130118, PR China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 4 School of Science and Technology, Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, GA, 30043, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Georgia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 13, 2019
Volume
190
Pages
110079–110079
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.110079
PMID: 31841891
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The application of Atrazine in soil has always been a main problem in agriculture because its residuals may maintain in the soil for a long term. In this paper, two strains of Atrazine degrading bacteria (Klebsiella sp. FH-1 and Arthrobacter sp. NJ-1) were used to make biological compound microbial inoculum to repair the Atrazine contaminated typical black soil in Northeast China. Grain chaff was chosen as the optimal carrier material for microbial inoculum. The dynamic changes of Atrazine were detected by gas chromatography. The half-life of Atrazine in soil containing microbial inoculum was shortened from 9.8 d to 4.2 d. The Atrazine sensitive crops grown in the repaired soil showed increased stem length, root length, and emergence rate. The effects of microbial remediation on the original bacterial and fungal biota in the typical black soil in Northeast China were analyzed using the metagenomic approach. Results showed that Atrazine inhibited the original bacteria and fungi populations. The total numbers of bacterial and fungal species in the soil were partially recovered by adding the microbial inoculum. Two genera (Sphingosinicella and Sphingomonas) were the dominant bacteria. The beneficial bacterial biota was recovered and the number of species of the beneficial bacteria was higher than that in the original soil after adding the microbial inoculum. The dominant fungi included genera Guehomyces and Chaetomella. There was a total of 113 unclassified fungal genera (22.6% of 499), indicating the potential utility of the unclassified fungal species in the assessment of the soil contamination by Atrazine. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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