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Symmetry Processing in the Macaque Visual Cortex.

Authors
  • Audurier, Pauline1, 2
  • Héjja-Brichard, Yseult1, 2
  • De Castro, Vanessa1, 2
  • Kohler, Peter J3, 4
  • Norcia, Anthony M5, 6
  • Durand, Jean-Baptiste1, 2
  • Cottereau, Benoit R1, 2
  • 1 Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, Université de Toulouse, 31052 Toulouse, France. , (France)
  • 2 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 31055 Toulouse, France. , (France)
  • 3 Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
  • 6 Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cerebral Cortex
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
May 14, 2022
Volume
32
Issue
10
Pages
2277–2290
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhab358
PMID: 34617100
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Symmetry is a highly salient feature of the natural world that is perceived by many species. In humans, the cerebral areas processing symmetry are now well identified from neuroimaging measurements. Macaque could constitute a good animal model to explore the underlying neural mechanisms, but a previous comparative study concluded that functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to mirror symmetry in this species were weaker than those observed in humans. Here, we re-examined symmetry processing in macaques from a broader perspective, using both rotation and reflection symmetry embedded in regular textures. Highly consistent responses to symmetry were found in a large network of areas (notably in areas V3 and V4), in line with what was reported in humans under identical experimental conditions. Our results suggest that the cortical networks that process symmetry in humans and macaques are potentially more similar than previously reported and point toward macaque as a relevant model for understanding symmetry processing. © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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